Pavan's Tai Dam Table Runner

IMG_9279.jpg
IMG_9272.jpg
IMG_9271-1.jpg
IMG_9279.jpg
IMG_9272.jpg
IMG_9271-1.jpg

Pavan's Tai Dam Table Runner

58.00

Hand-spun, hand-dyed, and handwoven indigenous cotton in a traditional design referencing a diamond-shaped seed.

Add To Cart

Color + Pattern: The designs were traditional, referencing the diamond-shaped mahoy seed. The dyes are natural, produced in the village from the indigo plant and macbau, a small fruit plant used for the red.

Material: Hand-spun, hand-dyed, and handwoven indigenous cotton cloth. Edges hand-sewn and tassels added by Indigo Lion.

Region: Thabou Village, Luang Prabang Province, Laos

Weaver: Pavan

Care: Gentle wash or hand wash in cold water with mild soap. Do not soak. Line dry or tumble dry low. Iron as needed.

February 2016 - Excerpt from  “  Letting Serendipity lead to a weaving village in Laos ” on our blog, The Handmade Chronicle:  Next we walked down the road to a cluster of traditional wooden homes built on stilts to Lasoy’s sister’s house. Pavan and her husband welcomed us warmly and showed us her collection of cotton textiles she had also handspun, hand dyed, and hand woven. She had products ready to sell.  Inquiring more about the textiles, the cotton was grown from nearby farms, as was the raw silk (we visited the silkworms in various stages of production at another woman’s house).  The designs were traditional, referencing the diamond-shaped mahoy seed. The dyes are natural, produced in the village from the indigo plant and macbau, a small fruit plant used for the red.  A little negotiating and I bought two pieces that I could envision as table runners. Pavan seemed most grateful for the sale, eyes watery and her palms pressed together, thumbs touching her forehead, saying  khob chai  to us, “thank you.” We learned after that her health was not good and the money would help her get treatment.

February 2016 - Excerpt fromLetting Serendipity lead to a weaving village in Laos” on our blog, The Handmade Chronicle:

Next we walked down the road to a cluster of traditional wooden homes built on stilts to Lasoy’s sister’s house. Pavan and her husband welcomed us warmly and showed us her collection of cotton textiles she had also handspun, hand dyed, and hand woven. She had products ready to sell.

Inquiring more about the textiles, the cotton was grown from nearby farms, as was the raw silk (we visited the silkworms in various stages of production at another woman’s house).

The designs were traditional, referencing the diamond-shaped mahoy seed. The dyes are natural, produced in the village from the indigo plant and macbau, a small fruit plant used for the red.

A little negotiating and I bought two pieces that I could envision as table runners. Pavan seemed most grateful for the sale, eyes watery and her palms pressed together, thumbs touching her forehead, saying khob chai to us, “thank you.” We learned after that her health was not good and the money would help her get treatment.