Hmong Hemp Batik + Appliqué Vintage Textile

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Hmong Hemp Batik + Appliqué Vintage Textile

120.00

Vintage handmade hemp textile with drawn batik motifs and red appliqué detail from the Hmong ethnic group of Xieng Khoung, Laos.

Pattern:
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Currently only the “red appliqué 1b” style is available.

Size: 11” x 71.5”

Ethnic Group/Region: Hmong of Xieng Khoung, Laos

Materials + Technique: Handwoven indigenous hemp cloth, hand drawn wax resist (batik) motifs, indigo hand-dyed, with appliqué. Vintage piece approximately 30-40 years old. 

Artisan Enterprise: Hmong Hemp Fabric Shop, Luang Prabang, Laos

 (February 2018)  I got to know the Vue family a little bit, who run the Hemp Fabric Hmong Shop in Luang Prabang, since I showed up at their shop on quite a few occasions. There’s Tou (older brother), Xeng (younger brother), Lulu (wife of younger brother) and Vi, their infant son.  The first time I entered the shop I was approached by Xeng, the owner. He studied economics at university and two years ago decided to open his Hmong shop. It’s clear he’s dedicated to his Hmong family traditions and culture, sources directly from families from his village Nakhampheng and neighboring villages, and is doing what he can to preserve their unique traditions by sharing with others, and curious foreigners like me.  They all sew, too, making contemporary items from vintage designs. And they offer a wax-resist batik stamping class, which was great fun, then dyed in indigo the next day for pick up.  There are shops that are welcoming, that are free with their knowledge and generous with their time, and joyful at what they are doing. Not all places are like this. But this one most definitely was.

(February 2018)

I got to know the Vue family a little bit, who run the Hemp Fabric Hmong Shop in Luang Prabang, since I showed up at their shop on quite a few occasions. There’s Tou (older brother), Xeng (younger brother), Lulu (wife of younger brother) and Vi, their infant son.

The first time I entered the shop I was approached by Xeng, the owner. He studied economics at university and two years ago decided to open his Hmong shop. It’s clear he’s dedicated to his Hmong family traditions and culture, sources directly from families from his village Nakhampheng and neighboring villages, and is doing what he can to preserve their unique traditions by sharing with others, and curious foreigners like me.

They all sew, too, making contemporary items from vintage designs. And they offer a wax-resist batik stamping class, which was great fun, then dyed in indigo the next day for pick up.

There are shops that are welcoming, that are free with their knowledge and generous with their time, and joyful at what they are doing. Not all places are like this. But this one most definitely was.