We paused for inspired writing around handmade

We discovered our inner prose and glimpsed into another part of the globe. We were moved by each other’s writings that evoked memory, that inspired story, that recalled people and place and unique insight.


Some of the amazing friends and supporters who participated in the Indigo Lion Pause sessions! Top: Florence, Aida, Sush, Ann Marie, Kate, Andrea, Alex, Sharmila, Louise, Kara, Mary, Sarah. Bottom: Florence, Kate, Mary, Kim, Sush

Some of the amazing friends and supporters who participated in the Indigo Lion Pause sessions! Top: Florence, Aida, Sush, Ann Marie, Kate, Andrea, Alex, Sharmila, Louise, Kara, Mary, Sarah. Bottom: Florence, Kate, Mary, Kim, Sush

What happens when you hold handmade craft in your hands? What will it inspire you to write? This is what we discovered together in three Indigo Lion Pause sessions this fall.

We paused together to hold handmade craft in our hands and write from the heart. We discovered our inner prose and glimpsed into another part of the globe. We were moved by each other’s writings that evoked memory, that inspired story, that recalled people and place and unique insight. We created beautiful conversations and it was magical.

Michelle, Rini, Evan

Michelle, Rini, Evan

The idea of Indigo Lion Pause coming to life

It started in my travels and living abroad over the years. I’ve long been fascinated by beautifully crafted objects and their stories. I would hold them in my hands, see them up close, let my imagination wander and wonder, and try to get a sense of the person who made it. 

Then a couple of years ago, I would get together with Sushmita Mazumdar, an artist, writer, and educator at her studio, Studio Pause for monthly “Mary Pauses”. These were wonderfully creative sessions. One of things I proposed was conversations with objects. I selected a few handcrafted items I had acquired in Mexico and Morocco and wrote freely what came to mind. I was surprised at what was revealed in my conversations. They were full of interesting associations, current emotions, and meaningful insights.

I had conversations with these two handcrafted objects: a ceramic container from Fez, Morocco and an Oaxacan rabbit figurine that was a gift from a dear friend in Mexico

I had conversations with these two handcrafted objects: a ceramic container from Fez, Morocco and an Oaxacan rabbit figurine that was a gift from a dear friend in Mexico

Then this past summer I started attending Sush’s “writing pauses, as she calls them, where we would use the monthly community art on her studio wall as prompts. In ten minutes we would write whatever came to mind — whether associations from past, or present thoughts, weaving in fiction, poetry, prose, whatever. With current issues being what they’ve been this year, we had conversations about race and religion, language and ethnicity, love and social justice.

Kara, Sush, and Tannia inspired by Susan Sterner’s photographic posters of women day laborers in Guatemala at one of Studio Pause’s writing pauses.

Kara, Sush, and Tannia inspired by Susan Sterner’s photographic posters of women day laborers in Guatemala at one of Studio Pause’s writing pauses.

It was also around this time that Sush proposed the idea of doing a series of writing pauses with a twist: focusing on the handmade crafts I was bringing in from Laos, Myanmar, and Cambodia as prompts for writing. It all came together and Indigo Lion Pause was born.

Here I am at the launch of the first Indigo Lion Pause in October, focusing on Laos textiles and accessories

Here I am at the launch of the first Indigo Lion Pause in October, focusing on Laos textiles and accessories

The magical happenings of inspired writing

The instructions were simple. We could choose whatever handmade item on the display that spoke to us, bring it on our laps, feel it in our hands, and then in ten minutes write whatever thoughts came. There wasn’t any right or wrong way, or any particular way to do it. Just lean in and let our imagination be free to discover what might appear in writing. We were often surprised at what we wrote. But it was all from the heart, unfiltered, and on the spot. In that sense, it was magical.

Andrea, Alex, Victoria, and Susan

Andrea, Alex, Victoria, and Susan

LAOS

In October we touched the gentle indigo-dyed textiles from the Tai Leu, the ink-black woven bamboo from the Tai Lao, and the inlay woven beading from the Katu in Laos. Feelings of warmth and peace, memories of one’s grandmother and mother, of faraway cafes and imagined stories all came alive in our writing.  

Details from cushion covers, napkins, table runners, hand cloths, and purses — all accessories and home accents from the Tai Leu, Katu, and Tao Lao ethnic groups. Traditional and adapted designs, hand spun, hand dyed and handwoven natural cotton using natural dyes. LAOS

Details from cushion covers, napkins, table runners, hand cloths, and purses — all accessories and home accents from the Tai Leu, Katu, and Tao Lao ethnic groups. Traditional and adapted designs, hand spun, hand dyed and handwoven natural cotton using natural dyes. LAOS

Starting upper left, clockwise: Padee of the Tai Dam ethnic group; women weavers of the Katu ethnic group; Chaban and Noy (mother and daughter) and Sengmany  of the Tai Leu ethnic group (photo credit: MaTeSai for Katu weavers and Sengmany). LAOS

Starting upper left, clockwise: Padee of the Tai Dam ethnic group; women weavers of the Katu ethnic group; Chaban and Noy (mother and daughter) and Sengmany  of the Tai Leu ethnic group (photo credit: MaTeSai for Katu weavers and Sengmany). LAOS

MYANMAR

In November we wrapped ourselves in uniquely designed blankets by the Tiddim Chin weavers of Myanmar. We got close to the intricate patterns, coiling tassels, and embroidered motifs. We traveled along railroads and went to villages at night, we felt textures and decided on designs, and told stories about reindeers and drums.

Upper left and bottom right: blankets with traditional motifs and designs reflecting Tiddim Chin culture. Upper right and bottom left: weavers Phyu Win and Sui Te (photo credit of weavers: Chin Chili Myanmar Folk Art). MYANMAR

Upper left and bottom right: blankets with traditional motifs and designs reflecting Tiddim Chin culture. Upper right and bottom left: weavers Phyu Win and Sui Te (photo credit of weavers: Chin Chili Myanmar Folk Art). MYANMAR

Upper left and bottom right: blankets with traditional motifs and designs reflecting Tiddim Chin culture. Upper right and bottom left: weavers Vung Pi and Oo Man (photo credit of weavers: Chin Chili Myanmar Folk Art). MYANMAR

Upper left and bottom right: blankets with traditional motifs and designs reflecting Tiddim Chin culture. Upper right and bottom left: weavers Vung Pi and Oo Man (photo credit of weavers: Chin Chili Myanmar Folk Art). MYANMAR

CAMBODIA

In December we swooned over gorgeous rough-spun silk accessories made by Cambodian weavers and sewists. We let the colors take us to sky and fields, to subtle moods and wonder, to savor ice cream and remember home and childhood.

Weavers from a women’s cooperative in Krang Thong Village, Cambodia; Bottom right on left: Vibol Sath, founder of Colors of Life Social Enterprise; details of multi-colored designs of hand spun and handwoven rough silk accessories. CAMBODIA

Weavers from a women’s cooperative in Krang Thong Village, Cambodia; Bottom right on left: Vibol Sath, founder of Colors of Life Social Enterprise; details of multi-colored designs of hand spun and handwoven rough silk accessories. CAMBODIA

Multi-design and multi-color rough silk hand spun and handwoven accessories: Starting upper left, clockwise: Coin purses sewn by N. Hang; shoulder bags sewn by Vandy; scarves woven by Sok Khim. CAMBODIA

Multi-design and multi-color rough silk hand spun and handwoven accessories: Starting upper left, clockwise: Coin purses sewn by N. Hang; shoulder bags sewn by Vandy; scarves woven by Sok Khim. CAMBODIA

And of course all of the items were available for purchase so participants could take home the ones they fell in love with.

What’s next? The curating beautiful conversations booklet!

Handmade craft has an energy and an unfolding story - from the artisan who made it, to liaisons working with those artisans, to me sharing it with others, and finally enthusiasts of handmade. We all contribute to the story of handmade.

With that in mind, I’m compiling a booklet of the Indigo Lion Pause sessions to share our beautiful conversations with others. I’ve invited all the participants to contribute their writings with the intent to share it with the artisans and liaisons in Laos, Cambodia, and Myanmar.

It’s a way to complete the circle and to show how we’re all connected, how what they do matters and how their handmade craft inspires us.

Kara and Alex

Kara and Alex

And this, what I wrote in an earlier post, “The beautiful conversations held in my hands”:

Most importantly, I want to tell her how much I genuinely love what she’s made. I want to tell her that holding it in my hands is a delight, as if I can feel its energy knowing that she’s held it before me. I feel a glimpse of her culture by its colors and patterns and materials that are not my own, but allow me a moment of wonder about hers.

I want to thank her for sharing it with me and tell her to keep making more because there are many others who would enjoy experiencing this too. This is my conversation, held in my hands, what I want to tell her. And in that moment we are connected, if only in my mind, around the one thing we do have in common, that we both held in our hands her beautiful handmade craft.

Aida and Florence

Aida and Florence

A final reception will be held where we’ll showcase the finished booklet, share our collective experiences, and a chance to buy a copy! Stay tuned for upcoming details.

Thank you! 

A huge thank you to Sushmita Mazumdar for this awesome and fun collaboration, for opening your studio to us, and for conceiving of these wonderful writing pauses. Your constant enthusiasm, creativity, and tremendous support made the Indigo Lion Pauses spectacular.

Sush!

Sush!

Thank you to all the participants (many of whom are dear friends and supporters) who paused from busy days and crazy lives to experience something new — writing about textiles from Southeast Asia, delving into memory and association and story, and sharing together a range of perspectives and emotions. I learned something from each of you and have tremendous appreciation for your writings.

Sarah, Ann Marie, Sharmila, Brittany, and Su

Sarah, Ann Marie, Sharmila, Brittany, and Su

Finally, a big shout out to John Chapin, Alexandra Boycheck, Sharmila Karamchandani, and Brittany Noetzel for your enduring belief in me, good counsel along the way, and support beyond words. Thank you Alex Treble, Sushmita Mazumdar, and John Chapin for taking and sharing photos.

Michelle, John, Evan, Sush, Alex, Rini, and Susan

Michelle, John, Evan, Sush, Alex, Rini, and Susan

It really was a lot of fun.

It really was a lot of fun.